Writing

Full Length Plays

A Midwinter Night's Revel

Promotional illustration by Jenna Abts, courtesy of Walking Shadow Theatre.

Mortals and fairies collide at the darkest time of year

The English woods have been besieged by iron-sided progress, but ancient magic still endures. When Gwen receives a gift from the otherworld, she must come to grips with the secret it brings. But while Oberon and Titania debate her fate, a band of amateur players try to rekindle their own holiday spirit in the shadow of the Great War. A Yuletide play of discovery and rejuvenation in the spirit of A Midsummer Night's Dream.

PRESS

"Those of us who were fortunate enough to catch William Shakespeare’s Land of the Dead at the 2008 Minnesota Fringe Festival know that playwright John Heimbuch can take the classics into unexpected territory. This time he adapts A Midsummer Night’s Dream not with bloodthirsty zombies, but set in the shadow of World War I. Heimbuch immersed himself in the study of traditional English holiday customs for this creation, emerging with a work that draws on folklore and seasonal house-to-house performing troupes to find the textures of time, death, and family in addition to our usual understanding of what has often been one of Shakespeare’s “brighter” plays—usually given short shrift to the weird supernatural darkness underpinning the mistaken identities and weird loves."
-- Quinton Skinner, Minnesota Monthly

CAST

7 men, 3 women, plus fairies as needed

RUNTIME

120 minutes, one intermission

PRODUCTION HISTORY

Production, Walking Shadow Theatre, December 2015

Workshop reading, Walking Shadow Theatre, March 2015

Workshop reading, Artist Initiative Grant*, April 2012

* This activity is made possible in part by a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, through an appropriation by the Minnesota State Legislature and by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

LINKS

Walking Shadow's production

Heimbuch's script is a great intellectual feat, tossing several balls immediately into the air and keeping them there for the play's duration, dispensing tidbits of information at a heady, entrancing pace that may have you on the edge of your seat. - Jay Gabler,
TC Daily Planet

Mailing List

Find Me Online

john@johnheimbuch.com